Saturday Cup of Joe: a lending and tech(ish) newsletter from Detroit

Saturday Cup of Joe #118.

Friends & Colleagues,

Week 118. Vacation and a short week, know what I mean? Thank you for continuing to read Saturday Cup of Joe. I appreciate the feedback and the ongoing dialogue each week. This week I hope a short week for me presents a new (and shorter) set of links. Enjoy.

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Credit: Ivan Sanford from Unsplash

This week all over the city the scooter share company, Bird, dropped scooters. One day our street corners were empty and the next day there were rental scooters all over the city. Interns, the early adopters of Detroit, were all over it and downloaded the app, riding right away. I have yet to subscribe but the concept seems popular already. Last week I saw first-hand how many in DC picked up a scooter to get around. Detroiters didn’t take long to acclimate. From what I’ve heard some cities fight the company to make what point, I’m not sure, while others like Detroit seem to allow it. I’m curious to see how scooter sharing compares with ride share or bike share here in the D.

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Have a great weekend.

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“Realize that now, in this moment of time, you are creating. You are creating your next moment based on what you are feeling and thinking. That is what’s real.” — Doc Childre

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Apple hit a value of $1 Trillion this week. In case it’s hard to conceive of that number, New York Times created a visual representation for how many other companies it would take to equal one Apple.

Source: The New York Times
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Data visualization

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Have you seen this? Have you heard about this?: A recent study, as published by Bloomberg, explores the use of American land. In fact, the 100 largest private landowners own land larger than the state of Florida.

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Free time: Ever wondered if life is better in California or if it’s really as a big deal in NY as New Yorkers make you think, Coleman Furniture evaluated the free time in all 50 states. En masse, it turns out that Maine, Wisconsin, Alaska and Michigan are states with the most free time.

Interestingly, there are findings you might not expect:

· More average hours worked a week is correlated to worse economic outcomes

· States where workers take the most allowed vacation time tend to have higher rates of unemployment and lower senses of financial well-being

· States with shorter commute times love their jobs and have cheaper houses but the feel less of a sense of purpose

I don’t know what this means about our workers or our communities but it’s interesting. How can you use this information in your organization?

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Millennial minute: In the two+ years that I’ve been writing Saturday Cup of Joe there have been quite a few “observing millennials” and even more “dissecting millennials” articles. This one might be in the hall of fame. Millennials are changing hotels (and all experiential services)!

My brother-in-law enjoys naming the way bars, restaurants and other stores that attempt to mimic an authenticity of another time and another place. He’ll tell you about faux-industrial, faux-pioneer, faux-woodsman. I didn’t even have to see the “Rockwell Group designed common area in the Marriott branded hotel” to know it’s faux-something.

If millennials value experiences, how do we ensure the experiences are authentic? Designed to be like the experience is not the same. The big difference between millennial consumers are the ones that just want the experience to look good on social media (whether or not it is authentic) and those that want the story, want the experience, want the authenticity. Whichever group wins out will be the one history will remember as millennials, the winners will define the generation.

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Bare knuckle fighting: Seriously, ever think you are tough? Look at this. Bare knuckle boxing.

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Urbanism: Mumbai is the largest city in the world in a few decades. By 2100, the third largest city in the world could be in Tanzania and the largest city would be in Nigeria. This video projects a changing global migration and is an interesting, if not click-baity, 2+ minutes.

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The Belt, Detroit, USA

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An American Farmer: This guy raises snails. Snails. Seriously. Ever wonder what a snail farmer does? Here’s a look into this world.

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Turns out it is the 10 year anniversary of “the crash.” New York Magazine decided to compile several articles from “then and now.” In fact there are opinions from Sheila Blair to Boots Riley on what happened and many in between. If you are someone who likes to revisit history, check it out.

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The view from 30,000 feet

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“Nothing lasts, nothing is finished, and nothing is perfect.” — Richard Powell

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Innovation in higher education: Ever since I read Moneyball I have been interested in the idea that there are many “stats” that we are not properly measuring. I wrote my law school note on whether Moneyball can inform how we measure (or rank!) the most valuable law schools. In this Medium post, universities from MIT to Syracuse to technical colleges are affirmed for their commitment to innovation and technology. How do you think about innovation? How do you think about higher education?

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Good investment: We know that Silicon Valley has been struggling with recognizing the contribution of women in tech. Forbes reports that the lack of women in tech extends to VC funding of women-owned startups. For instance, Forbes reports “Women-owned companies only receive a small slice of total venture capital funding. But what is surprising is how much more effective women-owned businesses are at turning a dollar of funding into a dollar of revenue — they generate better returns, and are ultimately a better bet.” Consider this who you hire and where you invest.

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Photo essay of abandoned Russia: An interesting collection of photos of abandoned Russia.

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Today’s thought: In speaking to a group of aspiring leaders this week, I shared the podium with another team leader. She and I spoke about leadership lessons and advice to young leaders. I don’t know what you think of off the top of your head to tell young leaders but it’s not easy. Build a vision. Encourage the buy in. Reinforce the goals. Communicate. It is helpful to step back and consider your leadership style at a distance. Imagine having to explain to a room of aspiring leaders your leadership style. What would you say?

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Quote: “We cannot live only for ourselves. A thousand fibers connect us with our fellow men.” — Herman Melville

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Bonus Content: 5 Questions for bosses that will help you be a better leader.

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@earthpix on Instagram

Written by

Thinker, curious leader, once an attorney…always trying to answer well.

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